Photo credits: Yongmei Gong

Photo credits: Yongmei Gong

"When I first arrived in Switzerland to pursue a Master's degree 11 years ago, I thought 'Just get the degree and go back to China'. Now I'm in the northern capital with my French husband and lovely daughters, and you see how life is full of surprises. That's the same as in doing science, the same as in child-caring. That's why I love them. My life is definitely not the easiest one, but less boring."

HiSScience Basement
HiS_2017_13.jpg

"I was interested in studying cells in general, and luckily I found a research group working on rod cells and ended up working as research assistant. I am finishing my Master's thesis and going to study medicine after that. For me science is about knowing how the world works. Though my family does not fully grasp the content of what I'm working on, they nevertheless are proud and boast about it."

Science Basement
Photo credits: Alok Jaiswal

Photo credits: Alok Jaiswal

“We are participating in a competition to propose a scientific solution for Personalized medicine. However, as this is still a research in progress, the limitations are quite expected. And since we are in a competition, the other contestants are not perfect either. Believe in your own vision and be open-minded. That is how we reached the final!”

 

Science Basement
Photo credits: Niku Kivekäs

Photo credits: Niku Kivekäs

"Despite my facial expression, I feel extremely lucky to have found a field of study that has taken me to magnificent places from sea level to the vicinity of the high peaks of the Himalayas. Spending several years with the topic, snow still brings the smile on my face: how it sounds under one’s shoe, its uniqueness, and its beautifying, illuminating and cleansing effect on nature. Now through studies and research I have become fascinated by the importance and the profound complexity of snow."

Science Basement
Photo credits: Ekaterina Baibuz

Photo credits: Ekaterina Baibuz

“There is no strict answer to what the difference is between scientific and artistic research. Both science and art work with problems, but have different goals. Definitive knowledge, which is the goal of scientific research, would be a dangerous notion in art. Art creates pluralistic objects that allow for various responses to coexist for at least some time. That is why, I think the goal of artistic research is to obtain a temporal consistency of such pluralities. The best art is always a bit uncertain, but in a beautiful way, because it opens the possibility for returning and reinterpretation but that is true for science as well. But for science, it is more robust: it is absolute truth unless it’s disproved by somebody else.” (Divnogorie, Russia)

Science Basement
Photo credits: Petra Tauscher

Photo credits: Petra Tauscher

“Luck plays a huge role! It is like a surfer trying to get the perfect wave. You need the skills, no doubt about that! But there has to be a wave and you have to be there at the right time, at the right place. Scientists don’t like luck. But it is there and I think I have been incredibly lucky.”

Science Basement
Photo credits: Fredric Granberg

Photo credits: Fredric Granberg

"I applied to a medical school, but I didn’t get in. I was accepted to a physics program and when I started it I realised that it was my thing: it’s challenging and interesting. I’ve just started my first summer job and I am a bit worried I don’t have enough knowledge yet, but I’m looking forward for more challenges!"

Science Basement
Photo credits: Alok Jaiswal

Photo credits: Alok Jaiswal

“I wanted to be a surfer, but one day I met this professor who inspired me to become a scientist. He was a well known guy and used to consider himself as a student, and I found that really inspirational. I wanted to become like him. I am so happy every morning, and I always say yes to everything. Because I know that whatever I do, that day I will learn something new”

Science Basement
Photo credits: Fredric Granberg

Photo credits: Fredric Granberg

"I really like the idea of continuing with research, for a while at least, but I don’t know if I’m gonna do that for the rest of my life. It feels like a really stressful job and it doesn’t feel secure enough. But what keeps me motivated is that you are actually doing something that is probably going to change the world at some point in the future even though your work might be just a small piece of a very big puzzle. What motivates me the most is that I am a part of something a lot bigger than I am. "

Science Basement
Photo credits: Petra Tauscher

Photo credits: Petra Tauscher

"I haven’t got this idea of ‘where do I see myself in 10 years’. I just know that I like science, it’s exciting and new all the time. If it is not fun, why do it?"

Science Basement