Travelling in the Solar System

Date: 24 March 2017, 15:00 onwards

Location: Tiedekulma (Yliopistonkatu 4)

Presenters: Urs Ganse, Erika Palmerio, and Eleanna Asvestari (University of Helsinki)

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Let’s talk about traffic in Spaaaaace! If you think there’s traffic only on Earth, then fasten your seatbelts and get ready to be amazed!
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Imagine you wake up in the cockpit of a spaceship one morning. Would you know which buttons to press, which levers to pull and what maneuvers to fly, in order to safely get back to Earth? After Urs Ganse’s presentation, you will! As author of a popular science book on manned spaceflight and general know-it-all in Space Physics, he’ll give you a quick rundown of how not to die in space.
(If, instead of returning to Earth you’d rather want to fly to the Moon and find out which cheese it is made of, you will also learn how to do that.)
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What if, instead of going to space yourself, you just want to explore the Solar System while sitting comfortably on your sofa? That’s right - we humans can build spacecraft and send them to space to do the dirty job for us! Erika Palmerio will present a brief history of 60 years of unmanned Solar System exploration, from the very first satellite sent in orbit to the future missions and challenges to face. Who knows, maybe in some billions of years an alien civilisation will find one of our old spacecraft and send their greetings back!
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And now picture being a particle from the deep Universe that suddenly encounters our Solar System, which is filled up with magnetic fields, electric fields, and a flow of solar particles, all controlled by the Sun. What would your journey be like? Eleanna Asvestari will take you along the journey of charged particles, aka the Cosmic Rays, from the moment they enter our Solar System until they reach Earth and interact with our atmosphere, producing even more particles. And if we are still on board we will find out how these new particles are stored in natural archives and can tell us lots about solar activity in the past!

Science Basement